What does it mean when a bump gets bigger?

What does it mean when a bump gets bigger?

What does it mean when a bump gets bigger?

If you’re expecting your second or subsequent baby, you may also tend to have a larger bump. This is probably because your tummy muscles have been stretched by previous pregnancies. Being overweight, or gaining a lot of weight during pregnancy, may also make your bump look bigger.

Where does your pregnancy bump start showing?

“At 12 weeks, your growing uterus can no longer hide inside your pelvis behind your pubic bone,” says Sherry Ross, an OB/GYN at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California. “Instead, it starts to protrude into your abdomen.” For some women, that shift translates to a starter baby bump.

When does the bump start showing?

Typically, your bump becomes noticeable during your second trimester. Between 16-20 weeks, your body will start showing your baby’s growth. For some women, their bump may not be noticeable until the end of the second trimester and even into the third trimester.

What does a low bump mean?

We’ve all heard the tummy forecasts: A high, tight bump means it’s a boy; low and wide means it’s a girl. And if you’ve got an extra-large bulge? Well then you have an extra-large baby on the way.

Does a pregnancy bump feel hard?

If you’re in your second or third trimester of pregnancy and you notice that sometimes your pregnant belly gets very hard, feels tight, and even causes mild discomfort, you’re probably experiencing Braxton-Hicks contractions.

When does bump growth slow down?

At 36 weeks pregnant, you are now in your ninth month of pregnancy and the end is in sight. Believe it or not, after 8 months of rapid development, by week 36 your baby’s growth is actually starting to slow down as you prepare to give birth.

Why is my bump so low down?

Carrying Low Toward the end of your pregnancy, you may notice that you’re carrying lower than before almost overnight. This is probably because your baby has dropped or lightened in preparation for being born. (Not all babies do this; some don’t drop until labor starts.)