How aggressive is IBC?

How aggressive is IBC?

How aggressive is IBC?

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare, aggressive form of breast cancer. Instead of forming a lump, the disease causes the affected breast to become swollen, red and tender, often in a matter of days or weeks. Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare, aggressive form of breast cancer.

Which type of breast cancer has the best prognosis?

Pure mucinous ductal carcinoma carries a better prognosis than more common types of IDCs. Papillary Carcinoma – This is a very good prognosis breast cancer that primarily occur in women over the age of 60.

How quickly does IBC progress?

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) causes a number of signs and symptoms, most of which develop quickly (within 3-6 months), including: Swelling (edema) of the skin of the breast.

How long can you live with IBC without treatment?

IBC tends to have a lower survival rate than other forms of breast cancer3. The U.S. median survival rate for people with stage III IBC is approximately 57 months, or just under 5 years. The median survival rate for people with stage IV IBC is approximately 21 months, or just under 2 years.

Where does breast cancer usually spread to first?

The lymph nodes under your arm, inside your breast, and near your collarbone are among the first places breast cancer spreads. It’s “metastatic” if it spreads beyond these small glands to other parts of your body.

At what age do most people get IBC?

IBC tends to occur in younger women (younger than 40 years of age). African-American women appear to develop IBC more often than white women. IBC is more common among women who are overweight or obese. IBC also tends to be more aggressive—it grows and spreads much more quickly—than more common types of breast cancer.

What does IBC pain feel like?

Unusual warmth of the affected breast. Dimpling or ridges on the skin of the affected breast, similar to an orange peel. Tenderness, pain or aching. Enlarged lymph nodes under the arm, above the collarbone or below the collarbone.

What happens if IBC is left untreated?

IBC is the type of disease that inspired most of us to be physicians. It is severe, rapidly progressive, and lethal within weeks to months if left untreated-a great mystery among breast cancers and unusually aggressive, even if we consider all solid, nonhematologic tumors.

How fast does IBC progress?